Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. + (0)63 288 5433 F. +82 (0)63 288 5411

Seoul Office

(04031) 4F, 16, Yanghwa-ro 15-gil, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)2 2285 0562 F. +82 (0)2 2285 0560

Jeonju Cine Complex

(54999) 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)63 231 3377

COPYRIGHT © JEONJU International Film Festival ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

로고

이전 이후
12th
Korean Feature Film Competition
Anyang, Paradise City
Director_ Park Chan-kyong
Korea 2010 102min HD color/b&w feature
Review

As a general trend, it is becoming increasingly difficult and almost meaningless to classify movies according to a genre or type. As post-modernists have long since pointed out, in this 21st century that we live in, we have witnessed the blurring of boundaries between opposing concepts. Often at times, the virtual seems more real than reality and reality itself becomes ever more surreal. Director Park Chan-kyong’s first feature-length motion picture, Anyang, Paradise City, strives to embody this trend. The plot is centered on a 1988 fire, which destroyed Anyang’s Greenhill Factory. The movie portrays diverse aspects of both the city’s past prior to this tragic event and the resulting changes following it. The various subplots are each given separate subtitles and successively depict: Anyang’s municipal and mayoral elections; the Four Rivers Project and the New Town Project; and the dilemmas and folklore surrounding an archaeological excavation site. Taken together, these scenes offer a vivid portrayal of the city’s historical and political background and in the process also highlight the artificial and provocative modes of expression inherent in motion pictures, themselves. The hodgepodge and experimental style of this movie is befitting of a director who also happens to be a photographer, critic, and director of short-films. The director provides us with a witty take on how the meaning of identical sounds and images can be expanded or changed. Through the use of seemingly unrelated background music, effective cinematography, and editing of scenes. This is one film that is sure to have its fair share of both admirers and critics. (Kim Sun-yub)

CREDIT
  • DirectorPark Chan-kyong
  • ScreenplayPark Chan-kyong, Kim Young-gle
  • ProducerKim Min-kyung
  • CinematographyJee Yune-jeong, Che One-joon, Park Chan-kyong
  • EditorYoo Sung-yup, Park Chan-kyong
  • MusicKang Min-suk
CastKim Yeri, Park Min-yeong, Kim Jong-gu, Park Chan-kyong
DIRECTOR
Park Chan-kyong
He earned his bachelor’s degree from Seoul National University, College of Fine Arts, Department of Painting and graduated from Graduate School of CalArts where he majored in Photography. He has been exhibiting several private exhibitions, biennales, and displays on famous foreign museums through works of photos, videos, installed arts and more, with their subject matters being cold war, division, and traditional religious culture. He also was awarded with Hermes Korea Missulsang Award in 2004. Short film Flight and Shindoan was nominated from numbers of prestigious film festivals not only within the country but from foreign countries as well. His full-length debut film, Anyang, Paradise City, was screened in International Film Festival Rotterdam 2011. Also, short film Night Fishing which he directed together with Director Chanwook Park, received the Golden Bear award from the 61st annual Berlin Film Festival.
Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)63 288 5433 F. +82 (0)63 288 5411

Seoul Office

(04031) 4F, 16, Yanghwa-ro 15-gil, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)2 2285 0562 F. +82 (0)2 2285 0560

JEONJU Cine Complex

(54999) Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)63 231 3377