Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)288-5433 F. (063)288-5411

Seoul Office

(06740) 2F, Kyeongwon Bldg., 56 Bawoomoe-ro 43, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. (02)2285-0562 F. (02)2285-0560

Jeonju Cine Complex

(54999)22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)231-3377

COPYRIGHT © JEONJU International Film Festival ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

로고

이전 이후
13th
Time Regained
We Can´t Go Home Again
Director_ Nicholas Ray
USA 1973 93min 35mm color/b&w feature
Review

Godard once wrote that Nicholas Ray reinvented the cinema by himself, and that compliment best suits this controversial work. In the early 1970s, Ray engaged in a joint project with the students from Harper College in New York, an adventurous work to push forward cinematic imagination. In this experimental film with a combination of theatrical movie and documentary, images start to show their own impromptu dance. Four or five segmented images are shown in the screen simultaneously, continuously overlapping with one another. The film even pours out the abstract colors and digital effects (controlling TV’s internal circuits) introduced in Paik Nam Jun’s video art works. The film’s story is as radical as its style, seeking to become a meta-film. The background is the distressed United States during the Vietnam War with active anti-war movements, and Ray in this movie appears as a former Hollywood filmmaker. This film is not only a political work to observe young people’s voices and direct responses, but also aeta-film about de-familiarizing the filmmaking process. Indeed, as Ray himself plays the role of a filmmaker, this film bears personal and connotative meanings. The title We Can’t Go Home Again is the same with that of Thomas Wolfe novel, which expressed the sense of loss, and hints grim nostalgia and discouraged utopia as shown in Ray’s The Lusty Men (1952). In Ray’s films, the actors filled with discontent wind up facing tragedy, which overlaps, by destiny, with the director’s portrait. Ray edited this ambitious work until the last days of his life.

CREDIT
  • DirectorNicholas Ray
  • ProducerNicholas Ray
  • ScreenplayNicholas Ray, Susan Ray, Tom Farrell
  • CinematographyRichie Bock, Peer Bode, Danny Fisher, Mark Goldstein, Stanley Liu, Steve Maurer
  • EditorRichie Bock, Charles Bornstein, Tom Farrell, Danny Fisher, Mark Goldstein, Nicholas James, Carol Lenoir
  • SoundSteve Maurer, Luke Oberle, Ken Ross
CastNicholas Ray, Tom Farrell, Jill Gannon, Jane Heymann, Richie Bock, Danny Fisher, Leslie Levinson, Stanley Liu, Luke Oberle, Ned Weisman, Phil Weisman
DIRECTOR
Nicholas Ray
Born in Wisconsin in 1911 and died in 1979. Nicholas Ray is a film direcotr who rose to prominence in the 1950s. He made his debut with in 1949 and he was best known for his sensitive portrayal of society’s outsiders. Although Ray’s films focus on intimate relationships and their emotional dynamics, upon closer investigation one finds a prophetic awareness of political and social movements as the underpinnings of his characters’ lives.
Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)288-5433 F. (063)288-5411

Seoul Office

(06740) 2F, Kyeongwon Bldg., 56 Bawoomoe-ro 43, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. (02)2285-0562 F. (02)2285-0560

JEONJU Cine Complex

(54999)22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. (063)231-3377