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로고

이전 이후
13th
International Competiton
Southwest
Director_ Eduardo Nunes
Brazil 2011 128min 35mm b&w feature
Review

The most noticeable feature of this film is its 3.66:1 aspect ratio. Given that most widescreens have a ratio of 2.35:1, this film’s super-scope screen ratio definitely provides a special experience of watching a movie. By employing the widescreen adopted by the avant ? garde artists in Europe in the 1920s, this film invites the audience to enjoy it as art through rich visual textures that capture all the details it has to show. Sound designer and documentary director Eduardo Nunes displays telltale ability to capture rich sound of nature. Shot in 16mm black-and-white, the film refers to a lake village in southwestern Brazil, but it is hard to guess the time. Just like a myth, legend or fairytale circulating somewhere, this film is set on a surreal background. Clarice, a special kid, is born, grows up, ages and dies, all within one single day. During that 24 hours, she hangs out with a boy named Joao; talks with Luzia, deep in grief after losing her daughter; and also comes across Valadier, Joao’s violent father, Malaquias the old fisherman, a prostitute in that village, and a shaman. The narrative covering the whole life of a person from birth to death is rotational like the Mobius strip, conjuring up a mysterious mood. Faced with the unique features of this film, which unfolds one picturesque scene after another, the audience will recall the masters of long-take aesthetics such as Bela Tarr and Tarkovsky, as well as the artisans of mise-en-scene such as David Lean and Sergio Leone. With the combination of realistic direction that brings minimum dialogues and no music and captures the sound of nature as it is, highly calculated shots framed in artificial angles, and the performance of theatrical actors, this film brings a mysterious aura on its journey to the theme.

CREDIT
  • DirectorEduardo Nunes
  • ProducerHelder Dacosta, Patrick Leblanc
  • ScreenplayGuilherme Sarmiento, Eduardo Nunes
  • CinematographyMauro Pinheiro Jr
  • Art DirectorAndre Weller
  • EditorFlavio Zettel
  • SoundLeandro Lima,Gabriel D angelo
  • MusicYuri Villar, Cristiano Abreu,Tiago Azevedo
CastSimone Sponladore Clarice, Julio Adr
DIRECTOR
Eduardo Nunes
Eduardo Nunes was born in 1969, in the city of Niteroi, Brazil. He studied at UFF Film School and worked for several films as assistant director, producer and editor. He proceeded with other four shorts: Land Wind (1995), The Childhood of The Barbed Woman (1996), Tropel (2000) and Reminiscence(2001). Together, these films have won over forty prizes and have been shown in important festivals like Rotterdam, Berlin, Clermond- Ferrand, Havana, Brasilia, Gramado, etc. Nunes also works as a documentaries director for TV since 1998. Southwest is his first film. Currently, he writes the script of his second film, adapted from an Albert Camus novel, A Happy Death.
Jeonju Office

(54999) 2F, Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)63 288 5433 F. +82 (0)63 288 5411

Seoul Office

(04031) 4F, 16, Yanghwa-ro 15-gil, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)2 2285 0562 F. +82 (0)2 2285 0560

JEONJU Cine Complex

(54999) Jeonju Cine Complex, 22, Jeonjugaeksa 3-gil, Wansan-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do, Republic of Korea

T. +82 (0)63 231 3377